FORMLESSFINDER

New York, NY

WALL OVER It’s been said (…perhaps by Bill Clinton) that the fingerprint of a Presidency is more easily erased than it’s ever imagined to be.  It’s not always the case, but the sands of our political landscape tend to shift over decades and not terms.  Of course there are bad ideas along the way (many of them), and with some frequency political decisions have had the upper hand in erasing architecture and not the other way around.  Perhaps it’s because architecture is often too complex for it’s own good.  This project offers a simple intervention aimed at a ‘political solution’, where the flow of immigration might be far less clear than any campaign promises made it out to be.   Team: Garrett Ricciardi, Julian Rose

WALL OVER

It’s been said (…perhaps by Bill Clinton) that the fingerprint of a Presidency is more easily erased than it’s ever imagined to be.  It’s not always the case, but the sands of our political landscape tend to shift over decades and not terms.  Of course there are bad ideas along the way (many of them), and with some frequency political decisions have had the upper hand in erasing architecture and not the other way around.  Perhaps it’s because architecture is often too complex for it’s own good.  This project offers a simple intervention aimed at a ‘political solution’, where the flow of immigration might be far less clear than any campaign promises made it out to be.  

Team: Garrett Ricciardi, Julian Rose

Formlessfinder believes in architecture. The discipline’s deep—and inevitable—entanglement with a range of social, political, historical, and material forces grants it a productive potential as a catalyst of change that is unique among the many fields that make up our contemporary culture. But if there is one thing holding architecture back today, it is a widespread fixation on form, evidenced in everything from the overt pressure to produce “iconic” monuments that reduces buildings to brands and images to the tendency of green design to reduce urgent ecological concerns to the expression of a symbolic formal language. In contrast to these prevailing trends, our practice is grounded in an exploration of dynamic processes—physical, environmental, and material, but also theoretical and conceptual—that can escape the static certainties of form and push architecture beyond its normal limits. Our studio is truly a finder in the sense that it operates more like a search engine than a traditional design firm, fluidly analyzing a wide range of information and producing diverse outputs (buildings, pictures, videos, models, texts, products, data, software). Our built design work ranges from residential projects to public pavilions, art installations, restaurants, and retail structures.

 

www.formlessfinder.com